Here We Go!

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Like most of the country, it is definitely still winter here in the Pacific Northwest. While we do not have the blizzardy deluge of snow our Eastern friends are seeing, our yard and garden are a bit of a muddy swamp from the days and days and days of rain we have had this season.

As we see February on the horizon, however, we know spring is coming and it is time to get cracking if we are to have a thriving urban farming scene again this year. We’ve run out between rainstorms to work on pruning the fruit trees and starting to shore up the chicken coop and run–mending any raggedy parts from seasonal damage. Soon, we will be re-covering the run with poultry netting and while the gals have had free range of the entire garden for the fall and winter, they will be sequestered in their summer digs so we can start the cool season planting.

This also means that we have started the first round of seedlings indoors–under lights and with heating mats for extra warmth. Last year, we had good success with all of our heirloom seedlings started at home, so we’re hoping all the collards, broccoli, cauliflower, chard, and more we’ve tucked into little pots will provide an abundance of food in the coming months!

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And, of course, late January means new chicks here at Raggedy Hen Farm! We decided not to incubate eggs this year (partially because of the 8 hatchlings we had last spring, 6 turned out to be little roos!) so we figured out which breeds we wanted to add to the flock and marked on our calendar when they would be in at our local urban farm store. One of the strategies that works for us and our little city flock is to raise a handful of new chicks each year and “age out” the older gals. Last year, our oldest hens went to live on Kori’s mom’s place in Southern Oregon.

So far, one of our very favorite breeds is the rather utilitarian Rhode Island Red. Of our new little group, three of the chicks are Rhodies. Supposedly, they have all been sexed prior to coming to the store, so our chances are pretty good these pullets will be hens. Of course, this isn’t fool proof! We’ve ended up with a roo or two from store-bought chicks too.

Since it will be several weeks before the chicks are ready to live outside, we try to get them early enough that they are ready to go when our world warms up (but isn’t too warm) and the new chicks generally start laying mid-summer and, if we’re lucky, they young ones will lay a bit through the winter.

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Meanwhile, we are thrilled to report that, so far, our bees are still alive and well–abeit in a small winter bundle–in the hive! On warmish, sunny days, we look for activity and a few bees will buzz in and out of the hive entrance. They are taking a gander to see if there is forage before heading back in to wait out the rest of the winter weather. As you may remember, we did not take any honey from the hive last year. In our three years of beekeeping, we have yet to have a successful wintering over here in our cold, damp climate and we wanted to do everything possible to ensure their survival. Last year’s new Warre hive is working well and staying snug and dry, so our fingers are crossed! We’re not out of the woods yet, of course, but as of today, there are still bees in that there hive.

So…even though it’s not spring yet, there are the earliest of signs and our urban farm chores are picking up!

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Yes, this sunny yellow dandelion is blooming away in our damp January garden!

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